TROUBLE CITY

FRANK MILLER'S RONIN, RONIN, RONIN

Movie NewsDan VintonComment

Drippy.For all those offended by the terrible, terrible play on Limp Bizkit's crapfest "Rollin'", I'm sorry. On to the story.

Thanks to the success of a little spring movie called 300, Zack Snyder gets to make the Watchmen movie no one could get off the ground, WB is raking in gobs of cash and midget nudity has gone mainstream. Then there's Frank "He Who Needs No Introduction" Miller. Frank Miller has always been a well respected/succesful writer and artist in the comic community who's dabbled in Hollywood, but over the last few years, the guy is breaking out all over the place as studios have begun playing in the sandlot of his individual works: Sin City, 300 and now Ronin. Variety has confirmed what Devin revealed in February-- Warner Brothers have optioned the rights to the samurai meets the year 2060 and attached Yard Stomper Sylvian White to direct.

Not to be confused with the heavily armed Frankenheimer Ronin, Frank Miller's Ronin (aka, "drifting person"- i.e.- samurai whose masters kicked the wartime bucket) features a time-transported Samurai as he attempts to destroy the catalyst of his Ronin-ism- a demon named Agat. The action takes place in a futuristic New York amidst gangs, cannibals, robots and telekinetic Billys. The work (done under the DC banner circa 1983) is considered one of Miller's finest and, by Miller standards, weaves a pretty dense story.

Both big screen adaptations of Miller's work have taken a very Homage de Miller approach to their individual aesthetics-- while Ronin has a "Milleresque" feel, it doesn't retain the same hard shadowed look that became the trademarks of his later works Sin City and 300. Both of the films looked superfly-- it'll be interesting to see what kind of look Mr. White plans to bring with his entrance to the cinematic Miller trilogy.